//
archives

Human Genetics

This category contains 6 posts

Sensing viruses: shape matters

Viruses are basically packets of nucleic acid, DNA or it’s sister molecule RNA. Our cells have therefore evolved to recognise these molecules as a sign of virus infection. A recent study from Jan Rehwinkel’s lab in the MRC Human Immunology Unit has revealed a new way in which cells sense and respond to invading viruses. … Continue reading

Breaking boundaries in our DNA

Each of the cells in your body contains an instruction manual, otherwise known as your DNA, with all the information required to build an entire human being. An important open question in biology is how different cells get directed to the right part of this manual to find the instructions for their specific tasks. A … Continue reading

CRISPR computers: how to program a cell

Inside every cell in your body, a complex network of signals are constantly being sent, received, interpreted and acted upon. These signals tell the cell how and when to perform its particular specialised task, in concert with all the other cells surrounding it. Understanding how these networks operate is critical to developing a full understanding of biological systems, but … Continue reading

Cracking the code

Every year, thousands of children are born with health problems that are caused by changes to their DNA sequence, or genetic code. These changes might have been inherited from their parents, who are often unaffected themselves, and therefore have no idea of what they might be passing on to their children – and therefore, understandably, … Continue reading

It’s not all about sex: there’s a biological clock ticking in fathers too

It is well known that as a woman ages, the number and quality of eggs that she produces declines – making it more challenging to conceive later in life, and increasing the risk of difficulties during pregnancy. But what about men? In a recent study published in PNAS, a team of Wellcome Trust-funded scientists led … Continue reading

Making faces: New insights into craniofacial malformations

Craniofacial malformations, i.e. those that affect the head and face, make up over one-third of all congenital birth defects. These types of abnormalities can also have the greatest impact on patients, who often have concerns about their appearance that can have a significant impact on their quality of life. Professor Andrew Wilkie has been part … Continue reading

Enter your email address to follow the WIMM blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Monthly archive

Follow the MRC WIMM on Twitter