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cancer

This tag is associated with 11 posts

Science in the supermarket (and other unusual places)

You might reasonably expect to be accosted by a double-glazing salesperson or someone shaking a bucket for charity as you go about your weekly shop – but you’d probably be pretty surprised if someone intercepted you on your way out and asked if you know what your immune system does. That’s exactly what a team … Continue reading

Know your enemy: fighting cancer from the inside out

The horrific side effects of many cancer treatments are all too well known: hair loss, muscle wasting, loss of appetite – and many more. The reason that the majority of cancer therapies have such broad and devastating effects on the health of the patient is that these treatments are often what is known as non-specific: … Continue reading

Lighting up our sentinels

Traditionally, gynaecological cancers (those found in a woman’s reproductive system) are diagnosed using an invasive and potentially dangerous technique that often leads to additional health concerns for the patient – as if coping with the cancer itself wasn’t enough. Fortunately, scientists working in Professor Ahmed Ahmed’s lab at the WIMM have recently developed an alternative … Continue reading

An alternative path to immortality

In December 2015, David Clynes (a postdoc in Richard Gibbons’ lab) was awarded a 5-year fellowship from Children with Cancer to set up his own research group. Here, his colleague and co-author Barbara Xella describes the work that was instrumental in obtaining this funding, published in Nature Communications last year. Chromosomes are long DNA molecules … Continue reading

Can our own immune system beat cancer?

The MRC’s annual science writing competition, the Max Perutz Science Writing Prize, challenges MRC-funded PhD students to communicate the importance of their research to a non-scientifically trained audience in 800 words or less. This year, several students from the WIMM submitted excellent entries to the competition, including Tomek Dobrzycki (whose entry was published on the blog last … Continue reading

25 years of LMO2: from bad guy to good guy

Twenty-five years ago the gene that codes for the protein LMO2 was discovered. To mark this anniversary, the lab that made this initial finding, now based in the WIMM, have written a review article to highlight the history, current understanding and continued importance of this remarkable protein in human health and disease. In this blog, … Continue reading

From petri dish to personalised medicine

Bowel cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer. In 2011, over 40,000 people in the UK were diagnosed with the disease1: equivalent to one person every 15 minutes. In order to try and understand how and why this form of cancer develops, scientists need to be able to grow cells derived from … Continue reading

Step-by-step: determining the development of cancer

There are over 200 different types of cancer, with 1 in the 3 people in the UK being affected by the disease during their lifetime. Cancer is caused by an accumulation of multiple alterations to the genetic material inside a cell, and these changes can vary widely even between individuals suffering from the same form … Continue reading

What do polar bears, cancer research and Cheryl Cole have in common?

Sadly, it isn’t that Simon Cowell has decided to donate all profits from the next series of X Factor to WWF and Cancer Research UK – it’s the #nomakeup selfie. Whilst the debate rages over the relevance of a woman’s face without makeup (or a man’s face with makeup) to cancer awareness, the fact remains … Continue reading

David and Goliath in the fight against prostate cancer: how a tiny protein could help tackle a deadly disease

Prostate cancer kills over 10,000 men every year in the UK, which is why Prostate Cancer UK have launched Men United v Prostate Cancer; an army of scientists, doctors, nurses, fundraisers, celebrities, politicians and supporters all taking action on men’s health. Dr. Val Macaulay’s lab at the WIMM is part of this team, and here Dr. Tamara Aleksic, a senior scientist … Continue reading

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