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Cell biology

This tag is associated with 6 posts

Ever wondered where your blood comes from?

We all find out at a pretty young age what our blood is: often due to unfortunate incidents as toddlers involving overambitious attempts to run/jump/climb over household objects twice our height. But despite almost continually losing blood throughout our lives via cuts, grazes, injections and other incidents we almost never run out of the stuff, … Continue reading

Why one cell is better than 40,000,000,000,000

Your body is a mass of millions and millions of tiny building blocks called cells, which all work together seamlessly on a daily basis in order to allow you to eat, drink, sleep, work, consume caffeine and perform all other essential bodily functions. A major outstanding question in the biological sciences is how these cells … Continue reading

Learning the FACS

Modern scientific research is being revolutionised by incredibly powerful new technologies: machines which can read your entire genetic code; microscopes which can see individual molecules inside living cells; and computers which can re-create the big bang. In this post, Lucas Greder in Marella de Bruijn’s lab describes his experiences with another such technology: fluorescence activated … Continue reading

What do polar bears, cancer research and Cheryl Cole have in common?

Sadly, it isn’t that Simon Cowell has decided to donate all profits from the next series of X Factor to WWF and Cancer Research UK – it’s the #nomakeup selfie. Whilst the debate rages over the relevance of a woman’s face without makeup (or a man’s face with makeup) to cancer awareness, the fact remains … Continue reading

Just the FACS, man.

Many scientific institutes have a need for core facilities to process samples in a ‘cheap’ and efficient way. These centralised units have a big advantage over separate groups purchasing expensive pieces of equipment: they can pool financial resources and employ managers and operators with a high level of technical expertise to get the best possible … Continue reading

Capturing the genome

Your body is a community of approximately 37 trillion [1] cells – tiny structures of all shapes and sizes that work together to allow you to move, eat, breathe, sleep and perform all manner of other unpleasant bodily functions. Each cell has its own, specific, specialized job – but how does it know what to … Continue reading

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