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leukaemia

This tag is associated with 7 posts

Stopping the spread: towards new treatments for childhood cancer

Cancers of the blood, or leukaemias, that involve mutations in a gene called Mixed Lineage Leukaemia (MLL) have a very poor prognosis and are particularly prevalent in young children. Due to the aggressive nature of this type of cancer, there is an acute need for the development of more effective therapies to help treat the … Continue reading

Know your enemy: fighting cancer from the inside out

The horrific side effects of many cancer treatments are all too well known: hair loss, muscle wasting, loss of appetite – and many more. The reason that the majority of cancer therapies have such broad and devastating effects on the health of the patient is that these treatments are often what is known as non-specific: … Continue reading

How students see scientists: Part VII

Last year the WIMM established a collaboration with the Chinese University of Hong Kong to encourage and support medical students on the Global Physician Leadership Stream to participate in exchange studies overseas. This year, Timothy Liong Tipoe chose to spend the summer break from his medical studies working in Paresh Vyas’ lab with Lynn Quek, … Continue reading

Fishing for improved leukaemia treatments

To enter this year’s MRC Max Perutz Science Writing Award, MRC-funded PhD students were asked to answer the question: ‘Why does my research matter?’ Here, Tomek Dobrzycki (a PhD student in Roger Patient’s lab) publishes his entry for the Award, in which he describes why zebrafish might hold the key to understanding how blood stem … Continue reading

25 years of LMO2: from bad guy to good guy

Twenty-five years ago the gene that codes for the protein LMO2 was discovered. To mark this anniversary, the lab that made this initial finding, now based in the WIMM, have written a review article to highlight the history, current understanding and continued importance of this remarkable protein in human health and disease. In this blog, … Continue reading

What links Down Syndrome and childhood leukaemia?

In short: we don’t know – but scientists at the WIMM are hoping to find out. Just over a year ago, Professor Irene Roberts moved from the Hammersmith Hospital in London to the WIMM, where she is continuing her long-standing research into haematological disorders that affect newborn babies – particularly those with Down syndrome. In … Continue reading

Specifying stem cells, specifically

Your blood is made up of many, many different types of highly specialized cells: white blood cells to fight infections; red blood cells to carry oxygen; and platelets to allow your blood to clot (to name but a few). Scientists now know that all of these diverse cell types originate from a single parent cell … Continue reading

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