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WIMM

This tag is associated with 36 posts

How students see scientists: Part VI

In the latest post in our series of blogs written by students who undertake summer placements at the WIMM, Isabella Watts (a second year medical student at the University of Oxford) tells us why she would definitely advise other students to do a research placement as part of their training, and that actually science can … Continue reading

Vitamins help your immune system fight infection – but not how you might think!

We all know that it’s important to eat our greens, but can any of us actually explain why? Vitamins are critical for the normal growth and function of our bodies, but not always in entirely expected ways. In this latest blog, Lauren Howson explains how a subset of white blood cells can use vitamins to … Continue reading

How do you fix broken blood?

Congenital Dyserythropoietic Anaemia (CDA) is a rare disease that causes insufficient production of red blood cells. This means that the body is unable to carry enough oxygen around to its vital organs, resulting in dizziness, chest pain, tiredness and shortness of breath. In severe cases, patients are dependent on regular blood transfusions for life. In … Continue reading

Beyond the double helix

So, DNA. It’s a code; it’s made up of four letters, and it’s essential for life. Scientists worked out the sequence of the entire human genome about a decade ago (that’s all the DNA code in your body) so what else is there to know? A lot, says Barbara Xella – it turns out DNA … Continue reading

One week; one drug; one chance to walk again

Medical research aims to better understand and treat a plethora of different human diseases. But it is not often that scientists see their research translated directly to the clinical setting, and rarely are they are able to watch it have an immediate effect on patients. In this blog, Lauren Howson describes a remarkable new treatment … Continue reading

Why one cell is better than 40,000,000,000,000

Your body is a mass of millions and millions of tiny building blocks called cells, which all work together seamlessly on a daily basis in order to allow you to eat, drink, sleep, work, consume caffeine and perform all other essential bodily functions. A major outstanding question in the biological sciences is how these cells … Continue reading

What links Down Syndrome and childhood leukaemia?

In short: we don’t know – but scientists at the WIMM are hoping to find out. Just over a year ago, Professor Irene Roberts moved from the Hammersmith Hospital in London to the WIMM, where she is continuing her long-standing research into haematological disorders that affect newborn babies – particularly those with Down syndrome. In … Continue reading

Immunology taught by bees

As many of us are painfully aware, bees and wasps are best known for their irksome ability to deliver a nasty sting. But what isn’t so well known is that the contents of the sting can provide insights into how the body detects attacks from the outside world, and even provide potential new avenues for … Continue reading

How students see scientists: Part IV

A group of undergraduate students studying human biosciences at Petroc, a further education college in north Devon, were invited to visit the WIMM for a day. In the fourth blog from our series of posts by students who undertake work placements at the WIMM, they share their impressions of the experience. In mid-January this year, … Continue reading

A year in the life of a research institute: the WIMM blog celebrates its first birthday

Just over a year ago, the WIMM Blog first appeared on the Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine’s webpage, tentatively re-posting an article that had originally been written for the MRC blog Insight. Today, the blog is a fully-fledged interactive site, and has had over two and half thousand hits in the last four months alone. … Continue reading

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